I’m glad Microsoft is embracing open source

When someone, especially new software developers or those still in college, asks me whether they should learn Java or C#/.NET, my normal answer is something like “They both do about the same thing, but Java will run on almost anything, and almost all the development tools are free.  With C#/.NET you could pay hundreds for Visual Studio, and the programs will only run under Windows.

Microsoft has a long history seeing open source as the enemy, but has never had a problem stealing ideas from it. They even use marketing jargon that is directly opposite of reality.  My favorite case of this is Microsoft Windows Services for UNIX, which is actually UNIX-like utilities you install on a Windows computer to give it UNIX-like functionality, not something you add to a UNIX box to help it communicate with Windows.  In the past Microsoft has even called Linux a cancer.  These days they’re singing a different tune, one that goes “We love open source“.  We know what the motivation is.  In the real world, business computing environments are of mixed architectures and operating systems.  Everything needs to interoperate.  They’re not going to dominate the server world like they do the desktop.  But you know what?  I don’t even mind that they don’t mean it as long as they act like they do.  And they are.

Microsoft is opening up major parts of the .NET codebase to open source.  They’re doing so under the MIT license, not a GNU license, and that makes sense.  They’ve made major contributions to Linux in the past decade.  There’s also now a community edition of Visual Studio so you can use it for learning and some projects for free, which is long overdue for them.

I’m a Linux lover, not a Microsoft hater.  Any steps they take in the right direction are OK by me!

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1 comment

  1. Most marketing messages are directly opposite of reality. If the statements were true, they wouldn’t need to work so hard convincing people to believe them.

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