I apologize in advance because (1) this is a hot topic that may offend some, and (2) I posted like 87 times today.  However….

I just saw this article on WBUR’s website (the local NPR station) saying the Vatican is starting this huge investigation of U.S. nuns because they’re straying too much from Catholic doctrine, and not promoting church teachings.  Now, I’m not Catholic, and I’m seeing this from an American perspective, and allegation != guilt, but it seems odd to me that all these priests are found doing illegal and harmful things, and it’s all apologies and shuffling them from one area to another, but The Inquisition II is fired up because nuns aren’t wearing their habits.  I don’t get their priorities.

There’s a battle going on in many religious institutions, both internationally and locally, and that’s purity vs popularity.  Should a religious institution stay true to it’s original doctrine and morals, or should it bend with the times just a bit in the name of staying connected to their “target audience”?  Obviously, opinions on this will vary wildly.  Then there’s the cultural differences between different countries.  As that article rightly points out, the US has a highly individualistic culture, so some rules that aren’t a problem in Europe may be harder to follow here.

I would really like some feedback on these issues.  I think it’s an interesting problem.

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From Slashdot: Chicken Feathers May Hold Key To Hydrogen Storage. While what they say is plausible (in the MythBusters sense of the word), the original article is from Oregon Live.com, a source I know nothing about.A practical hydrogen car has been elusive for decades. Before the announcement this week by University of Delaware engineers, a nonstop trip from Portland to Eugene in a hydrogen car would need a tank bigger than 100 gallons to store liquid or gaseous fuel, even under high pressure.

Treated chicken feathers work like a sponge. They soak up large amounts of hydrogen and hold it in a small space so the tank can be a conventional size and the fuel won’t need to held under dangerously high pressures….

“It’s the most energy-rich material we have,” says Roger Ely, an Oregon State University professor who specializes in hydrogen, “It’s three times the energy content of gasoline on a pound-for-pound basis.”

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I found a link the other day to an interesting visual resume. This is a really interesting concept!  I don’t think it’s appropriate for me, but it’s way cool.

Much cooler than the story I heard on NPR this weekend about the ad exec who got laid off, and decided to advertise himself by putting a picture on his website of his generously-proportioned middle-aged body spread out naked on a bear skin rug.

Click on the image for a full-sized version.
Click on the image for a full-sized version.
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